Dishonesty Is Not The Best Policy: Employees Have Obligation To Always Be Honest With Their Employer

By James D. Kondopulos Dishonesty on the part of an employee casts a dark shadow on the relationship with his or her employer and, depending always on the context, throws into serious question the ongoing viability of that relationship –...

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Welcome to The 2020 Workplace: Attract, Develop and Keep Top Talent

By Nicole Girouard There has never been a time where we have been so connected. Information is at our fingertips 24/7 and we can find out, learn about, talk about, critique, contribute to, and share everything in a matter of...

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Safety Trumps Belief: Of Hardship and Helmets

By Graeme McFarlane Good employers are concerned about respecting the Human Rights of their employees, and they should be. Sometimes there can be a real tension between respecting Human Rights and the safe management of the workplace. A recent case...

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Human Rights Tribunal: A Schrenk Explainer

By Janice Rubin and Megan Forward On March 28, 2017, the Supreme Court of Canada (the “Court”) heard arguments in British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Edward Schrenk.1 The case raises very important issues as to who is entitled to...

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Investigation is the New Arbitration

By Harry Gray and Gavin Marshall Beware the misuse of the due process tool in your workplace management toolbox. Investigations are the new arbitration. More and more, the legal expectation is that a flavour of judicial objectivity, in the form of...

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Burger King Dealt a Whopper by BC Courts: Fired Fish Sandwich Felon Vindicated

By Kelsey Robertson In Ram v. Michael Lacombe Group Inc., 2017 BCSC 212, Ms. Ram, a cook at Burger King for 24 years, was dismissed from her employment for taking a fish sandwich, a side of fries and a drink...

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Two Wrongs Might Make a Copyright: Employees vs. Contractors with Intellectual Property on the Line

By Cameron Wardell It is not uncommon for companies to look externally when in need of services outside of the expertise of its organization.  Companies frequently look externally for marketing, design and programming services. Contracting for such services can assist...

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Non-Culpable or Innocent Absenteeism

By James D. Kondopulos and Gosia Piasecka In the recent arbitration decision of Vancouver Coastal Health Authority v. Hospital Employees’ Union (Termination for Non-Culpable or Innocent Absenteeism), B.C.C.A.A.A. No. 112, arbitrator John Sanderson, Q.C. upheld a grievor’s dismissal for...

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